Sudan and South Sudan

Testimony of John Prendergast - U.S. Policy Toward Sudan and South Sudan

Testimony of John Prendergast, Co-Founder of Enough Project, before the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Human Rights, and International Organizations on U.S. policy on Sudan and South Sudan given on February 26, 2014. 

Op-ed: New Lost Boys of South Sudan

A South Sudanese government soldier stands with others in Bentiu.

Today, renewed warfare in South Sudan is creating a new generation of Lost Boys. Two and a half years since winning its independence by way of a bloody, decades-long struggle strongly supported by the United States, rebel and government forces with their allied militias are recruiting young boys into their ranks.  Read More »

Refugees Once Again: A South Sudanese Perspective on the Crisis

Manyang Reath Kher

My earliest memories are of war, dead bodies, and of my own uncle saving my life. As a result of Sudan's second civil war, I became a refugee at the age of three. Now, war has come to my home country once again.    Read More »

Op-ed: Justice and accountability are the missing ingredient in South Sudan

South Sudanese civilians (AP)

Although there is no specific agenda for the planned South Sudan peace talks in Addis Ababa, most discussions will likely revolve around power sharing, the status of each side’s armed forces and negotiations on a transition of power.   Read More »

NGO Coalition Urges Administration: Fulfill Diplomatic Obligations in South Sudan and CAR

Over two dozen humanitarian organizations and NGOs have issued a joint appeal to Secretary of State John F. Kerry and Director of Office of Management and Budget Sylvia M. Burwell in advance of President Obama’s FY2015 Budget request to Congress, asking them to fulfill existing U.S. commitments in South Sudan and anticipate growing needs in the Central African Republic.  Read More »

NGO Coalition Letter on the Central African Republic and South Sudan

Over two dozen humanitarian organizations and NGOs have issued a joint appeal to Secretary of State John F. Kerry and Director of Office of Management and Budget Sylvia M. Burwell in advance of President Obama’s FY2015 Budget request to Congress, asking them to fulfill existing U.S. commitments in South Sudan and anticipate growing needs in the Central African Republic.

 

South Sudan Field Dispatch: "Peace Must Come Soon"

Displaced people arrive in Bor, South Sudan. (Ben Curtis/AP)

As South Sudan’s January 23 cessation of hostilities agreement falters, and a second round of peace talks is stalled in Addis Ababa, a new Enough Project field dispatch reflects on the causes and impacts of the conflict between the government and opposition forces and outlines core issues to be discussed in the ongoing negotiations.   Read More »

South Sudan Field Dispatch: Peace Must Come Soon

Recent fighting in South Sudan -- marked by evident war crimes and crimes against humanity -- must be resolved through an inclusive peace process, according to an Enough Project field dispatch authored by Enough Co-Founder John Prendergast. 

South Sudan Field Dispatch: Peace Still Possible Despite Apparent War Crimes

Date: 
Feb 19, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

South Sudan Field Dispatch: Peace Still Possible Despite Apparent War Crimes

Washington, D.C.— Recent fighting in South Sudan -- marked by evident war crimes and crimes against humanity -- must be resolved through an inclusive peace process, according to a newly released Enough Project field dispatch authored by Enough Co-Founder John Prendergast. The report, based on interviews in South Sudan and site visits to places where mass atrocities appear to have occurred, documents the impact of fighting between government and opposition forces and allied militias.

The report, “Peace Must Come Soon”, documents the aftermath of violence in the towns of Bor and Juba, with eyewitness accounts from displaced civilians and others on the scene. Heavy fighting and targeted attacks have displaced over 900,000 people, and the International Crisis Group estimates that over ten thousand have been killed since fighting broke out in December. 

Now, the bulk of the fighting is taking place in the Greater Upper Nile region, including in Unity, Jonglei,and Upper Nile states, comprising all of South Sudan’s significant oilfields. While the conflict was sparked by political disputes, the report states that the mobilization of forces by politicians on the basis of ethnicity has fueled and deepened inter-communal conflict. Recruitment of soldiers, including a large number of child soldiers, has continued even after the now-collapsed cessation of hostilities agreement, with a mass mobilization of Nuer militia in Greater Upper Nile and the launch of the government’s recruitment drive throughout South Sudan.

Report author John Prendergast says:

“Though the warring parties disagree strongly about the initial spark for the war, it is clear that actions taken by both is prolonging it. Mass recruitment, often on the basis of ethnicity, the use of child soldiers, ethnic-based targeting, and other actions are deepening the divides between communities and making reconciliation more difficult. It is urgent that this war ends at the negotiating table in Addis and not on the battlefield.”

As negotiations stall in Addis Ababa, the report argues for the preparation of a more inclusive peace process that addresses governance, accountability and reconciliation, security sector reform, and regional interests, citing the crucial role of civil society, political parties and regional partners in consultations and decision-making. Additionally, the report emphasizes the U.S. and international community’s role in supporting negotiations by deploying incentives and pressures to leverage the warring parties toward peace.

Read the report, "South Sudan Field Dispatch: Peace Must Come Soon": http://www.enoughproject.org/reports/south-sudan-field-dispatch-peace-must-come-soon

 

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Despite Truce, Satellites Confirm Malakal Under Attack Again

New Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) imagery shows more than 535 huts in and around Malakal have been destroyed in recent clashes, in direct violation the January cessation of hostilities agreement between South Sudan's combatant forces.  Read More »

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