Blog Posts in Publication Announcements

Posted by Katie Smith on Sep 5, 2013

Today, the Enough Project along with the Responsible Sourcing Network released a report,"Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting", that articulates key reporting components that are important to socially responsible investors and rights groups who have been advocates for a clean minerals trade.

Posted by Mara Getz on Jul 25, 2013
ohn Kerry, United States Secretary of State and Sec. General Ban Ki-moon

Following renewed fighting between the Congo’s national army, or FARDC, and the M23 rebel group, the U.N. Security Council will meet to debate the escalating conflict. 

Posted by Enough Team on Jun 10, 2013

A new report from the Satellite Sentinel Project and the Enough Project reveals that civilians in South Kordofan, Sudan continue to bear the brunt of the recent escalation in hostilities between the rebel Sudan Revolutionary Front, or SRF, in this case comprised of forces from the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement-North, or SPLM-N and the Darfurian Justice and Equality Movement, or JEM, and the government Sudan Armed Forces, or SAF.

Posted by Akshaya Kumar on May 9, 2013
Darfur Gold cover

Darfur is suffering its worst humanitarian crisis in years. Since the beginning of 2013, over 200,000 people have been displaced by what the government of Sudan dismisses as “inter-communal” violence. Ten years after the first reports of genocide trickled out of Darfur, an eerie echo of the past is sweeping across the region. The government of Sudan would like the world to believe that Darfur is plagued by intractable inter-tribal hatreds that inevitably lead to violent destabilizing conflict. But in a new report, “Darfur's Gold Rush: State-Sponsored Atrocities 10 Years After the Genocide,” Enough Project Senior Advisor Omer Ismail and I challenge that descriptive framework.  Our research shows that government-armed Abbala militias’ recent power play to displace the Beni Hussein people and thereby gain control North Darfur’s gold mines is not the product of inter-tribal rivalries. Instead, the Abbala offensive must be understood as a continuation of Khartoum’s campaign of state-sponsored atrocity and plunder in the region.